Flamenco dancing heats up cold London

The Latin heat of Spanish flamenco dancing is set to warm up London's chilly climes this month with the arrival of Rafael Amargo's Poet in New York.

The show will take place on Friday February 17th and Saturday February 18th at the Sadler's Wells Theatre on London's Rosebery Avenue. It could be an ideal way for tourists staying in top hotels in London to sample a taste of Spanish choreography during their stay in the capital.

Poet in New York is based on a collection of poems that Federico Garcia Lorca wrote in New York between 1920 and 1930 while studying at Columbia University and is a rich amalgamation of dance, music and poetry.

Featuring multimedia components, Poet in New York powerfully recreates the milieu of early 20th century New York for contemporary 21st century audiences.

The videographic part of the show features images of New York City in the 1930s, invoking a bygone era of Spanish religiosity and theatricality.

In some of the segments, dancers on a shadowy stage move like flamenco-dancing workers in front of a backdrop that recreates the era of the Great Depression, while in others, brightly coloured flowers slowly open and close before disappearing.

As well as traditional flamenco, the show also features other musical styles such as jazz, folk and ballet.

The show is being staged in London for the very first time, but it has previously been performed in New York at City Center.

Rafael Amargo is one of today's brightest stars in the world of flamenco dancing and is considered by some to be something of a rebel in the flamenco field.

His shows have won a number of awards, including the most high-profile and prestigious award for dancing in Italy, the Positano Leonide Massine accolade. In addition, Poet in New York was voted show of the decade by readers of Spain's most widely read news publication El Pais.
 

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