Hockney exhibition comes to Royal Academy

A major exhibition of acclaimed British painter and photographer David Hockney comes to the Royal Academy of Arts in London.

The exhibition, A Bigger Picture, is currently on show at Burlington House in west London until April 9th 2012 and features a wide range of landscape works by the Yorkshire-born artist, printmaker, draughtsman and stage designer.

Art lovers enjoying a stay at central London hotels will have an opportunity to see the impressive array of works on show at the exhibition, which include new paintings as well as specially commissioned works that have been inspired by the dramatic and stark East Yorkshire landscape.

The exhibition also includes some of Hockney's older art works, as well as a selection of his newer drawings and films.

A Bigger Picture is the first major exhibition of new landscapes by Hockney and spans a 50-year period, giving art lovers a unique glimpse into the artist's fascination with the depiction of dramatic scenery.

Art lovers will also be treated to a display of Hockney's iPad drawings and a selection of cinematic offerings produced using 18 different cameras.

The films are displayed on multiple screens and provide a fascinating glimpse into Hockney's artistic vision.

Born in Bradford, Yorkshire in 1937, Hockney studied at the Bradford School of Art between 1953 and 1957, before heading to the Royal College of Art.

In 1958, Hockney took part in the influential Young Contemporaries exhibition for the first time and was awarded with the Royal College of art gold medal in 1962 when he graduated.

In 1963, he moved to Los Angeles, California, where he began producing a series of paintings inspired by swimming pools.

Throughout the 1960s, Hockney was a major contributor to the Pop Art movement and is now widely considered to be one of the most influential British artists of the 20th century.

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