Attending The King’s Coronation | A Visitor’s Guide

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There can be no denying that the upcoming Coronation of King Charles III will be a pretty important event in London’s calendar.

There has not been a coronation in the UK since 1953 when the late Queen Elizabeth II was crowned 70 years ago.

London will be in a state of pure celebration, so for anyone planning a trip to the capital, if you could time it to coincide with this once in a lifetime event, you’d be sure to have memories to last a lifetime.

London is pretty special at any time- but over the course of a major event, the city takes on a whole new kind of magic.

Book a room in The Montcalm Royal London House and celebrate the King’s Coronation in one of the finest 5 star hotels London has to offer. Your Montcalm Hotel is home to several of the best restaurants in the area, and perfectly places you to enjoy the city wide celebration.

Let’s take a look at some of the key questions people have leading up to the massive event, and find out how best you can view the King on this special day.

When is the Coronation?

The Coronation will take place on Saturday the 6th of May- 8 months after his automatic ascension to the throne, following the death of his mother.

The actual crowning ceremony will take place in the morning, and there will be a full roster of events planned throughout the day.

Will it be Televised?

 The event will be internationally broadcasted, and shown in the UK by the BBC.

Apparently the BBC will even be lifting their TV licensing fee for the occasion, so anyone in the country is free to watch.

Where will the Coronation Take Place?

The ceremony itself will take place in the staggeringly beautiful Westminster Abbey.

Not only is this church one of the country’s most gorgeous buildings, it’s also where every single royal coronation has taken place since the crowning of William the Conqueror in 1066, after the successful Norman invasion of Britain- that’s 39 coronations!

The church has hosted 16 royal weddings and several state funerals too.

What Happens During the Ceremony?

During the ceremony the King will take the oath and swear to lead the nation with law and justice, as well as ensuring the continuation of christianity in the nation- although this year will feature an alteration that reflects the diversity of modern Britain, and respects all religions.

The King will then be seated in St. Edwards Chair and be anointed, blessed and consecrated by the Archbishop of Canterbury.

He will then receive the Sovereign Sceptre that represents his control over the nation, and the Sovereign’s Orb that represents the power given to the Royal family by god.

At this moment the King will have the crown of St. Edward placed on his head and officially become King of the United Kingdom.

Around 2,000 people of note have been invited to attend the ceremony, making it much smaller than his mothers who had a massive 8,000 people in attendance.

The King has requested Greek Orthodox music to be played in honour of his father, the Duke of Edinburgh, and there will also be music from the London Symphony Orchestra and several pieces written by Lord Andrew Lloyd-Webber.

How to See the King and Queen on Coronation Day

After the ceremony has taken place there will be a procession through the streets of London, where millions of civilians are expected to be waiting to greet the King and Queen.

The route has not yet been published, but it is safe to assume that the route won’t be too dissimilar from the Queen’s own procession 70 years ago.

This route took her from Westminster Abbey to the Wellington Arch, then along the eastern border of Hyde Park, across to Oxford Circus and through Trafalgar Square, before passing under Admiralty Arch and finally, up the Mall to Buckingham.

There will be plenty of good places to watch the King and Queen along the route, so make sure you pick a good spot.

Unfortunately, only invited individuals will get to attend the actual ceremony but there will be plenty to do for us regular folk.

Will Prince Harry Attend?

This is one of the big questions being asked at the moment, and the only real answer is; only Harry himself knows.

The Prince alleged in his recent book that he would only attend if he was issued a public apology from the family, but who knows.

It is thought that if Harry does indeed attend there will be no official role for him in the ceremony, and he will attend like a regular invitee.

Will there be a Bank Holiday?

This was another point of great importance for the British public, and to the dismay of many, it seemed at first like the British Government would simply move another bank holiday to this weekend.

However, the decision was made to have this as a stand alone bank holiday, meaning the country will be on a 3 day weekend.

The city will be alive with celebrations from Friday to Monday, meaning anyone visiting at this time could not have chosen a better moment to visit London.

What Will Happen After the Ceremony?

After the ceremony at the Abbey, the King and Queen will arrive back at Buckingham Palace where they will head to the balcony to hold a ceremony of their own.

Members of the immediate Royal Family will join them and be given new roles, and titles to hold for the King’s term.

It is thought that King Charles will place a much smaller focus on the extended members of the Royal Family, instead keeping things close to the chest.

In the city, the party will begin after the procession has finished. There are many places across the city where you’ll be able to join in with the celebrations, and there is even a music and performance concert being held at Windsor Palace.

Visiting London at a Special Time

So there you have it, everything you need to know about how to get involved with the Coronation of King Charles III.

Make an already special weekend extra memorable by booking a room in one of the best hotels in Park Lane; The Montcalm Royal London House. Enjoy an incredible weekend celebrating in the city, then return to the best luxury accommodation London can offer.

It’s bound to be a magical weekend.